Iran Veil Police

No Veil = No Human Rights in Iran

Iran Veil PoliceIn a recent article published on http://www.frontpagemag.com/, Dr. Rafizadeh discusses the Iran regime’s crack down on Iran’s Islamic hijab laws. Not only does the Iran regime demand women to wear full black covering (chador), but now Iran’s President Rouhani intends to enforce this law by way of thousands of police called the “veil police.”

Rafizadeh says:

Not only do the veil police arrest, fine, and imprison those who violate Iran’s Islamic “veil” code, they also allow public services only to those who wear full veil and chador, not the normal hijab.

Hence, if you want to use hospitals, medical clinics, public libraries, government buildings, universities, and so on, you have to wear the full veil (chador), not the normal hijab.

What does this mean for the human rights situation in Iran? The Iran regime continues to move its country and people towards more extremism and gender discrimination.

Read the full story, “THE ISLAMIC VEIL POLICE” on Frontpagemag.com.

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People's Mujahedin Organization of Iran #stopexecutionsiniran

Iran Government Wages a War on Its People

Time and time again, Iran is listed as the country with the second highest rate of executions in the world.The Huffington Post shared an insightful article from Movements.org, that discusses the disturbing human rights violations taking place in Iran.

Below is an excerpt from the article:

The cruel and unusual punishment the Iranian government inflicts on its citizens does not stop at death sentences for crimes not meeting international standards, but continues in its treatment of prisoners currently sitting on death row. Two days after his execution, Hamed Ahmadi’s words gave the world a glimpse into the atrocities committed against death row prisoners. It describes how, over the course of five years, prison guards repeatedly left him with the impression he was to be executed the next day:

“The door opened. Our hearts started to pound. The nightmare of death was coming true…But 45 days went by. Every day, we thought we would be executed the next day but no one came for us. We approached death 45 times. We said good-bye to life 45 times.”

To read the full article or to share on social media visit The Huffington Post here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/iranian-government-wages-a-war-on-its-citizens_us_57c8098be4b06c750dd8cfbf 

Prominent United States politicians call for harder sanctions against Iran

In light of Iran’s recent missile tests, many United States figureheads and politicians have called for tougher sanctions against the Iranian regime, including Speaker of the House of Representatives Paul Ryan and Presidential Candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Iran launched two ballistic missiles capable of hitting targets 1400 km away at the end of a large military drill. It’s the first ballistic missile firing Iran’s conducted since signing nuclear deal P5+1 in July. Per US officials, this firing directly challenges a UN resolution made with Iran that specifically called upon Iran to not participate in ballistic missile activity.

Tehran’s missile tests rippled through the international community, with many United States officials calling for a tougher stance on the Iranian regime. United States Vice President Joe Biden said in a statement: “We are united in the belief that a nuclear-armed Iran is an absolutely unacceptable threat to Israel, the region and the United States.”

Speaker of the House of Representatives Paul Ryan said that he would continue to press for new sanctions against Iran until it stops provoking and threatening the United States and their allies. Several Republicans have echoed his sentiment, calling for more US sanctions in response.

Presidential Candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that she was “deeply concerned”  by Iran’s missile tests, and called for penalties against Tehran in response. “Iran should face sanctions for these activities and the international community must demonstrate that Iran’s threats toward Israel will not be tolerated,” she said in a statement.

Army General Lloyd Austin, commander of the United States Central Command, expressed his concern that Tehran’s missile test is further evidence that Tehran hasn’t changed as much as it wants the West to believe.

“There are a number of things that lead me to personally believe that, you know, their behavior is not — they haven’t changed any course yet.”

Maryam Rajavi: Regardless of outcome, Iranian regime will weaken after #IranElections

Maryam Rajavi, the president-elect of the Iranian Resistance, said in a statement this week that regardless of the outcome of the sham elections for the parliament and Assembly of Experts in Iran, the situation for Iranian people will not become better. Ultimately, Rajavi believes that the regime as a whole will weaken, its internal crises will intensify, and the resentment and anger that the Iranian people feel towards the mullah’s corruption will deepen.

Rajavi pointed out that Iran’s clerical regime is founded on a rejection of democratic sovereignty, and that while all of the running candidates for office are loyal to clerical rule, many were disqualified for displaying minor dissent against supreme leader Ali Khamenei. As supreme leader, Khamenei has the highest political authority in Iran, and has the power to disqualify political candidates from running for office should he consider them unworthy. Khamenei’s political filter has given ruling hardliners in Iran massive political leverage, and has made it impossible for Iranian citizens to establish a true democracy.

Khamenei’s power to deny was on full display this election season. Earlier this month, Khamenei infamously disqualified Hassan Khomeini from running for membership in the Assembly of Experts – the arm of the Iranian government that monitors the conduct of the supreme leader. Khomeini is the grandson of previous supreme leader Ruhollah Khomeini, and was popular among Iranian reformists.

As the internal struggle between rival factions and the ruling clerics of the regime heightens, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, who many hoped could institute political change, has been submissive to Khamenei’s restrictions, further establishing that despite his rhetoric, he either does not have the will or the strength to create a truly democratic Iran. His inaction has been disappointing to former supporters, particularly women, who feel frustrated by their lack of civil representation.

Maryam Rajavi stressed that whatever the outcome of this election, the strains between the Iranian people and the Iranian regime will only intensify. As whispers of democratic futility and projected low voter turnout grows among Iranians, the Iranian regime pushes harder to facilitate participation in their curated ballot, issuing fatwas to make participation in elections a religious obligation and defining a blank ballot as a direct violation of Sharia law.

Rajavi determined that even if the ruling clerics emerge from the election successful, the hostility that the Iranian people feel towards the mullahs and the mullah’s continued internal struggle to remain in power will ultimately make them weaker, not stronger. The political volatility in Iran in of itself is a loss for the regime.

Activists advocate for better human rights for Iranian women for #InternationalWomensDay2016

Last week, prominent women’s rights advocates from the United Kingdom voiced their concerns for the lack of gender equality and civil protections for women in Iran in an online conference hosted by the NCRI. The advocates condemned the Iranian regime’s poor treatment of women, and called on the UK and the international community to speak up against these injustices.

The online conference, moderated by Ms. Dowlat Nowrouzi, featured three prominent women’s rights advocates: Ms. Linda Lee, former President of the Law Society of England & Wales, Lady Val Corbett, prominent women’s rights activist, and Ms. Margaret Owen OBE, the director of Widows for Peace through Democracy. The advocates discussed Iran’s dismal treatment of women, pointing out the lack of safety women are afforded by the Iranian government and the denial of basic human rights.

“The terrible violence against women and youths in Iran is sickening,” remarked Margaret Owen, adding, “This regime executes juveniles and forces girls at the age of nine into marrying older men. At least 73 juveniles have been executed during the last decade, and according to Amnesty International, 160 are now on death row. Iran has signed up to the conventions on children rights but they do not care.”

The advocates praised Iranian women who object the Iranian regime’s misogyny, and noted the huge potential women have to change Iran, expressing their admiration in particular for Maryam Rajavi and the Iranian Resistance for leading the charge for women’s rights. “The change will come for women,” stated Linda Lee.  Lee urged young women to become more active, and requested that they get involved on social media and “stand with their sisters.”

The conference was broadcast live on the NCRI Foreign Affairs Committee last Friday. Read the full story here: http://www.ncr-iran.org/en/news/women/19918-activists-speak-up-for-women-s-rights-in-iran

Iranian women lose confidence in Rouhani, reformists as elections near

On the heels of Iran’s parliamentary elections, Iranian women are losing hope in the reformist party and current Iranian president Hassan Rouhani, according to a report by Reuters.

Rouhani won the Iranian presidential election in 2013 as a “moderate reformist” who ran on a platform to fix economic and social problems. His supporters had hoped his victory would lead to social change in Iran, but the dial on social freedoms has barely budged in Iran since his election according to rights campaigners, who contest that Rouhani’s presidency has made little progress in regards to political and cultural freedoms.

While Iranian women are among the most educated women in the Middle East, they are poorly represented and poorly protected by the Iranian government. Their legal witness testimony still only counts half as much as a man’s testimony in Iranian courts. Daughters in Iran inherit half as much as sons do. Women have a much harder time divorcing their spouse than men do, and men automatically receive custody of any children in a divorced relationship if the children are older than seven years old.

The lack of movement on these campaign issues have left Iranian women – specifically young Iranian women – feeling helpless. “What will change if I vote?” said a woman who could not win custody of her eight-year-old son after getting divorced in Isfahan. “Can reformist candidates give me equal rights?”

Read the full story on Reuters: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-iran-election-women-youth-insight-idUSKCN0VD2FS

#StopExecutionsIran: Protest in Paris tomorrow

Since Iranian President Hassan Rouhani took office in 2013:

  • Executions in Iran have continued, especially of ethnic and religious minorities. Over 2,000 people have been executed since Rouhani’s term in office. Amnesty International reported that nearly 700 people were executed by the Iranian regime in just over six months.
  • Iran continues to be the largest prison for journalists in the Middle East. Reporters Jason Rezaian and his wife Yeganeh Salehi were both released from Iranian prisons this week. Both were detained in Iran for over a year through “arbitrary and blatantly illegal treatment by Iranian authorities.”
  • Women continue to face violence and misogyny. In 2014, organized gangs affiliated with the Iranian regime committed acid attacks on Iranian women and girls. At least 25 women were subjected to these attacks.

Hassan Rouhani has been touring Italy and France this month in an effort to create an economic relationship between the West and Iran, but the devastating and blatant human rights violations that continue to plague the Iranian people under his leadership should not be ignored.

Join friends of the Iranian people tomorrow as they protest Hassan Rouhani’s civil and democratic violations.

No to Rouhani Rally in Paris
Thursday January 28 2016 | 13:00h in Paris’ Trocadero Square

Follow the event online with the hashtags #No2Rouhani and #StopExecutionsIran